2019 Recipients

Romina Tantalean

Romina Tantalean

University of British Columbia, Canada

Romina Tantalean is a master’s student at the Social Justice Institute (GRSJ), the University of British Columbia. Her academic background includes a law degree from Peru with a diploma in Public Policy, which she earned in 2013. Since then, she has worked at different public institutions and NGOs in the area of gender, development, and human rights, including addressing gender-based violence in culturally diverse settings. Her last jobs in Peru included the designing of a specific policy on gender equality and women’s economic empowerment. Also, the elaborating of a special report related to the progress made by the State in ensuring indigenous girl’s and adolescents’ rights within the school environment in the Amazon areas.

 Huamani Orrego

Huamani Orrego

University of British Columbia, Canada

Huamani was born and raised in the Maipo Valley of Chile, where he grew up in a small community with his family of around seventy people. Presently, the family community manages an ecotourism center, a private protected park, and an animal rescue center. Currently, Huamani is a master’s student in Integrated Studies in Land and Food Systems at the University of British Columbia. His research focuses on Indigenous Knowledge of Forest Ecology. Working on a project called “The Salmon Forest”, he and his colleagues are exploring the myriad of interconnections that occur between plants in symbiosis with mycorrhizal fungi and the salmon in the forest of the Pacific Northwest. His approach focuses specifically on the knowledge held about these interconnections from the perspectives of the First Nations Peoples.

Liz Beattie

Liz Beattie

University of British Columbia, Canada

Elizabeth Beattie is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia, on traditional, ancestral, unceded Musqueam territory. Her work includes investigating the role of Place as a legitimate, agentic teacher and knowledge-holder, advocating for the inclusion of multiple ways of knowing and being in educational meaning-making, and participating in processes of reconciliation. Beattie’s dissertation research explores how young children create meaningful outdoor environmental and science learning experiences through free play. She hopes to work with teachers and curriculum planners to incorporate outdoor learning into the standard curriculum, to promote meaningful, active, relevant, student-driven learning, teaching, and assessment.

Kwesi Yaro

Kwesi Yaro

University of British Columbia, Canada

Kwesi Yaro is a PhD candidate studying curriculum studies in Mathematics Education at the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada. He holds M.A in Mathematics Education from the University of British Columbia and B.Ed. (Mathematics focus) from the University of Cape Coast, Ghana. Kwesi is also a Sessional Lecturer for EDCP 340: Mathematics Methods at the Faculty of Education, UBC. Currently, he is working with researchers from multi-disciplinary STEM education backgrounds to explore the possibilities and challenges confronting 21st-century teachers in teaching mathematics for social justice. In his doctoral research, Kwesi is employing Afrocentric worldviews to investigate cultural strategies African immigrant families deploy to support their children's mathematics learning in the Canadian context. He hopes his research will contribute knowledge and insights that will guide teachers and other educators towards a more culturally responsive mathematics teaching.

Philipp Hummel

Philipp Hummel

Leuphana University, Germany

Philipp Hummel, born 1989 in Germany, is a research assistant at Institute for Socio-Organic-Research at Alanus University of Arts and Social Science in Alfter and a PhD student at the Centre for Sustainability Management (CSM) at Leuphana University in Lüneburg. He investigates the implementation of sustainability accounting and reporting in practice and its influences on sustainable development. Philipp additionally works as a business consultant and supports companies in improving their sustainability management.

Arthur Chen

Arthur Chen

University of British Columbia, Canada

Born and raised in New Zealand, Arthur Chen pursued a degree in mathematics and music at the University of Auckland, followed by a degree in music education at Berklee College of Music. He is currently a second-year M.A. student at the University of British Columbia in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy. As a K-12 educator, Arthur's research interests include mathematics education, music education, and curriculum studies. His current research focuses on the perspectives and practices of non-indigenous teachers of colour in decolonizing education. Alongside his academic pursuits, Arthur performs as a vocalist and keyboardist in classical, folk, jazz, and pop music.

Aparna Gopal

Aparna Gopal

University of Queensland, Australia

Aparna Gopal is an architect and urban planner, currently pursuing her PhD at The University of Queensland. Her research focuses on energy poverty and challenges faced by Indigenous residents in urban housing. She holds a Master of Urban Planning degree from the State University of New York, Master of Design Science with a focus on Sustainable and Illumination Design from the University of Sydney, and an undergraduate degree in Architecture from Anna University in India. Aparna enjoys working with local communities and her research, teaching and practice have taken her across India, the United States, the Middle East and Australia. She comes from an interdisciplinary perspective on understanding issues concerning the built environment.

Saori Ogura

Saori Ogura

University of British Columbia, Canada

Saori Ogura is a PhD student at the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia (UBC), and a UBC Public Scholar. She was the recipient of the 2017 Nikon Salon Miki Jun Inspiration Award for her photojournalism project documenting her time living in Sikkim and Darjeeling in India’s Eastern Himalaya. Her doctoral research explores the relationships between people and nature, with a particular focus on food security through diversity of traditional crops in Mazvihwa, Zimbabwe. She aims to be a part of revitalizing indigenous, drought-tolerant crops, by engaging communities through artistic practices.

Marie Rogel

Marie Rogel

Tohoku University, Japan

Marie Rogel is a researcher, science communicator, and development practitioner. She is presently affiliated with the Graduate School of Environmental Studies at Tohoku University, where she is a Monbukagakusho (MEXT) Scholar in the International Environmental Leadership Program. Her research and professional interests include sustainability, natural resource management, biodiversity conservation, agriculture, social-ecological systems, and environmental policy. She is currently involved in projects on citizen science for forest biodiversity conservation in the Philippines, and organic agricultural production and policy in the EU and Japan. She has an MSc in Sustainability, Culture, and Development from the University of Durham, and a BSc in Development Communication (Major in Science Communication, Minor in Environmental Science) from the University of the Philippines.

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Allison Earl

Allison Earl

University of British Columbia, Canada

Allison Earl, BArch, MEd, PhD, is a sustainability scholar in the combined disciplines of architecture and education, with a particular focus on applying design-oriented processes to the field of Education for Sustainability. Her work is concerned with teaching and learning opportunities for advancing the sustainability social movement within democratic urban environments, where she looks for spaces of transgression between informal and formal sites of learning. Her PhD thesis proposed an open, emergent and multivalent, productive understanding of sustainability that she carries into her current post-doctoral research, which focuses on active citizenship, participatory action and transformative learning, for urban sustainability.

Rachael Edino

Rachael Edino

University of Calgary, Canada

Rachael Ileh Edino is a PhD Candidate at the Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary, Canada and a Queen Elizabeth II scholar. She holds an MEd in Educational Studies, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, and a BEd in Social Studies Education, University of Jos, Nigeria. She is also a recipient of the University of Calgary’s Graduate Programs in Education Engagement Award.

Rachael’s doctoral research examines constraints to the implementation of the millennium development goal on universal primary education in Nigeria and opportunities for the sustainable development goal on education. At various times, she has been on the team of major research projects at the University of Calgary, e.g. academic integrity in Canadian universities, creativity in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in post-secondary institutions, and scholarship of teaching and learning projects. Rachael is interested in themes that deal with human development and education, gender and education, academic integrity, education and international development, and creativity in teaching and learning.

Debra Moffatt

Debra Moffatt

Royal Roads University, Canada

Despite outward appearances of a highly successful life, Debra Moffatt (guiltily) still felt something was missing. After 30+ years in retail and financial services, Debra is in the midst of attaining her MA in Professional Communication through Royal Roads University. Ethnographically, Debra is studying voluntary simplicity and its connection to the good life. She joins with others living voluntarily in simpler ways intended to nourish the body and soul, while simultaneously reducing their ecological footprint. The irony of Debra's past is informing her present studies as she explores voluntary simplicity's ability to feed the human desire for connection, creativity, and contentment in ways the typical "work to spend" lifestyle struggles to offer.

Peter Wanyenya

Peter Wanyenya

University of British Columbia, Canada

Pursuing a PhD at the UBC Social Justice Institute, Peter is a champion of developing resiliency among vulnerable young people with an emphasis on those that identify as Indigenous, migrant, and refugee, and on the ways in which sustainability applies in their social and cultural contexts. Peter's research has enabled him to engage in practices that foster tenets of responsible research and innovation - with a eye to social sustainability. These efforts have enabled Peter to be able to present his research and institutional and community-based practice across Canada and around the world in places like Mexico, Brazil, and Ireland.

Kshamta Hunter

Kshamta Hunter

University of British Columbia, Canada

Kshamta Hunter is pursuing her PhD in the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy at the University of British Columbia. She is also a Manager of Sustainability Student Engagement with the UBC Sustainability Initiative. Kshamta’s PhD research aims to investigate operationalization of innovative leadership capacity and the necessary knowledge, skills, values, attitudes, and competencies for innovation toward sustainability. Using culturally responsive pedagogical models, her study will explore urban youths’ adoption and conceptualization of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals that encourage social innovation.

In Their Words

It was an amazing experience to be a Graduate Scholar at such a big event. This conference brought an opportunity to grow my professional and research skills and it provided a great altitude of management while chairing sessions and being part of the team."

Jam Shahzaib Khan, 2016 Awardee

While I often find myself working within the realm of environmental sustainability, it was a great experience to hear multiple perspectives from the realms of social, economic, and cultural sustainability."

Christopher Olsen, 2015 Awardee